p.27, Raymond Loewy

PRR-S1-Loewy.jpg ‎(387 × 257 pixels, file size: 21 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)

— If I’d known there aren’t any specifically public domain photos of Raymond Loewy I’d have gotten one from one of his books on himself under Fair Use yesterday when I found them in the library downtown, 2 by him and one other plus a small write-up in a reference book; probably alot of other reference book write-ups with or without photos of him. My point basically is that I’m afraid that I think/suspect he’s a “bio-child” of some famous but controversial figure that I might as well leave nameless for the time being. Theodor Herzl, like Allen Ginsberg’s “Planet News” collection, had written a “News from Venus” as one of his first books, and in Mr. Loewy’s 1979 “Industrial Design” book he mentions that he’d done alot of work for NASA, all kinds of work for a long time, everything being difficult for me to keep track of all the dates and details on always, etc. He worked on the Space Shuttle too it seems. Lots of time here in Houston I’d guess while doing that. I read that  there’s something he’d started called Star of Hope in 1956 that then-Senator Johnson had read into the Congressional Record and I’ll try to track what happened to that project, and then I’ve lost or didn’t write down the name of the General that had introduced Loewy to JFK in 1962 and they’d re-done Air Force One’s exterior looks and he went on into NASA about from there I’d guess. “Loew” is the big name from Rabbi Loew of Prague, the golem-maker, the creator of artificially-made people, so I’m trying to find the links between Loewy’s father Maximilian and Theodor Herzl, who’s a super-controversial figure if you try to bring up that there’s anything untoward about any of his life of activities. Etc. I’m leaving all the Wikipedia copyright blurb because it’s so odd that you can’t find copyright-free or public domain photos of Mr. Loewy, and I’ll get back to straighten it out later.

Licensing[edit]

Non-free media information and use rationale for Raymond Loewy
Description Industrial designer Raymond Loewy standing on one of his designs, the Pennsylvania Railroad‘s S1 steam locomotive.
Source This is from the Raymond Loewy papers held at the Library of Congress. This may be copyrighted, the LOC data is unclear, but fair use is claimed.
Article Raymond Loewy
Portion used
Low resolution? Yes
Purpose of use Illustration of a historic photograph of a non-living person with one of his creations.
Replaceable? The image shows an unrepeatable composition of the subject of the article standing on one of his designs

  • Use of a low-resolution black and white version of the image does not hamper or dilute the copyright owner’s use of the original image
  • No free alternatives are available.
Non-free media information and use rationale for PRR S1
Description Industrial designer Raymond Loewy standing on one of his designs, the Pennsylvania Railroad‘s S1 steam locomotive.
Source This is from the Raymond Loewy papers held at the Library of Congress. This may be copyrighted, the LOC data is unclear, but fair use is claimed.
Article PRR S1
Portion used
Low resolution? Yes
Purpose of use Illustration of a historic photograph of a non-living person with one of his creations.
Replaceable? The image shows an unrepeatable composition of the subject of the article standing on one of his designs

  • Use of a low-resolution black and white version of the image does not hamper or dilute the copyright owner’s use of the original image
  • No free alternatives are available.

Raymond_Loewy_LOC.png ‎(303 × 421 pixels, file size: 120 KB, MIME type: image/png)

Structured data

CaptionsEdit

English
Add a one-line explanation of what this file represents

Summary[edit]

Description

English: Cropped to show Loewy only. Enhanced with GIMP.Title: Raymond Loewy Associates, 488 Madison Ave., New York City. Mr. Loewy under eagle

   Creator(s): Gottscho-Schleisner, Inc., photographer
   Date Created/Published: 1950 Nov. 16.
   Medium: 1 negative : safety ; 4x5 in.
   Reproduction Number: LC-G613-T-58314-B (interpositive)
   Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
   Call Number: LC-G613- 58314-B <P&P> [P&P]
   Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
   Subjects:
       Offices.
       United States--New York (State)--New York.
   Format:
       Acetate negatives.
       Portrait photographs.
   Collections:
       Gottscho-Schleisner Collection
   Part of: Gottscho-Schleisner Collection (Library of Congress)
   Bookmark This Record:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/gsc1994001639/PP/

Date
Source LOC, https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/gsc1994001639/PP/
Author Creator(s): Gottscho-Schleisner, Inc., photographer
Permission
(Reusing this file)
Public domain
This file is in the public domain, because No known restrictions on publication per the LOC, placed into the PD by the heirs of the photographer, https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/104_gott.html
In case this is not legally possible:The right to use this work is granted to anyone for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/history/gallery/loewy.html#.W9djlZNKjcs

https://paleofuture.gizmodo.com/raymond-loewys-nasa-designs-are-the-space-future-that-n-1645668220

Alex Carrel met Raymond’s brother Georges at the RIMR and took him back to France to work for him and Carrel comes up in alot of different subjects like this. Maybe he’s a “spawn sibling” to “JDR2” as I abbreviate Rockefeller, Jr. to.

Alexis Carrel
Alexis Carrel 02.jpg
Born 28 June 1873
Sainte-Foy-lès-LyonRhôneFrance
Died 5 November 1944 (aged 71)
Paris, France
Education University of Lyon
Known for New techniques in vascularsutures and pioneering work in transplantology and thoracic surgery
Medical career
Profession Surgeonbiologist
Institutions University of Chicago
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research.
Specialism transplantologythoracic surgery
Notable prizes Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (1912)

Carrel in 1912

Alexis Carrel (French: [alɛksi kaʁɛl]; 28 June 1873 – 5 November 1944) was a French surgeon and biologist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1912 for pioneering vascular suturing techniques. He invented the first perfusion pump with Charles A. Lindbergh opening the way to organ transplantation. Like many intellectuals of his time, he promoted eugenics. He was a regent for the French Foundation for the Study of Human Problems during Vichy France which implemented the eugenics policies there; his association with the Foundation and with Jacques Doriot‘s ultra-nationalist Parti Populaire Français led to investigations of collaborating with the Nazis, but he died before any trial could be held.[1][2][3][4] He faced media attacks towards the end of his life over his alleged involvement with the Nazis.[1]

Nobel Prize laureate in 1912, Alexis Carrel was also elected twice, in 1924 and 1927, as an honorary member of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR.[5][6]

Biography[edit]

Born in Sainte-Foy-lès-LyonRhône, Carrel was raised in a devout Catholic family and was educated by Jesuits, though he had become an agnostic by the time he became a university student.[citation needed] He was a pioneer in transplantologyand thoracic surgery. Alexis Carrel was also a member of learned societies in the U.S., Spain, Russia, Sweden, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Vatican City, Germany, Italy and Greece and received honorary doctorates from Queen’s University of BelfastPrinceton University, California, New York, Brown University and Columbia University.

In 1902, he was claimed to have witnessed the miraculous cure of Marie Bailly at Lourdes, made famous in part because she named Carrel as a witness of her cure.[citation needed] After the notoriety surrounding the event, Carrel could not obtain a hospital appointment because of the pervasive anticlericalism in the French university system at the time. In 1903 he emigrated to Montreal, Canada, but soon relocated to Chicago, Illinois to work for Hull Laboratory. While there he collaborated with American physician Charles Claude Guthrie in work on vascular suture and the transplantation of blood vessels and organs as well as the head, and Carrel was awarded the 1912 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for these efforts.[7]

In 1906 he joined the newly formed Rockefeller Institute of Medical Research in New York where he spent the rest of his career.[8] There he did significant work on tissue cultures with pathologist Montrose Thomas Burrows. In the 1930s, Carrel and Charles Lindbergh became close friends not only because of the years they worked together but also because they shared personal, political, and social views. Lindbergh initially sought out Carrel to see if his sister-in-law’s heart, damaged by rheumatic fever, could be repaired. When Lindbergh saw the crudeness of Carrel’s machinery, he offered to build new equipment for the scientist. Eventually they built the first perfusion pump, an invention instrumental to the development of organ transplantation and open heart surgery. Lindbergh considered Carrel his closest friend, and said he would preserve and promote Carrel’s ideals after his death.[8]

Due to his close proximity with Jacques Doriot‘s fascist Parti Populaire Français (PPF) during the 1930s and his role in implementing eugenics policies during Vichy France, he was accused after the Liberation of collaboration, but died before the trial.

In his later life he returned to his Catholic roots. In 1939 he met with Trappist monk Alexis Presse on a recommendation. Although Carrel was skeptical about meeting with a priest,[9] Presse ended up having a profound influence on the rest of Carrel’s life.[8] In 1942, he said “I believe in the existence of God, in the immortality of the soul, in Revelation and in all the Catholic Church teaches.” He summoned Presse to administer the Catholic Sacraments on his death bed in November 1944.[9]

For much of his life, Carrel and his wife spent their summers on the Île Saint-Gildas, which they owned. After he and Lindbergh became close friends, Carrel persuaded him to also buy a neighboring island, the Ile Illiec, where the Lindberghs often resided in the late 1930s.[1 — 

— they say to See Also: those Henrietta Lacks cell business and I can’t figure out why on that either yet.

U.S. National Archives

The objects in this collection are from The U.S. National Archives. The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) was established in 1934 by President Franklin Roosevelt. NARA keeps those Federal records that are judged to have continuing value—about 2 to 5 percent of those generated in any given year. There are approximately 10 billion pages of textual records; 12 million maps, charts, and architectural and engineering drawings; 25 million still photographs and graphics; 24 million aerial photographs; 300,000 reels of motion picture film; 400,000 video and sound recordings; and 133 terabytes of electronic data. All of these materials are preserved because they are important to the workings of Government, have long-term research worth, or provide information of value to citizens.

Disclaimer: A work of the U.S. National Archives is “a work prepared by an officer or employee” of the federal government “as part of that person’s official duties.” In general, under section 105 of the Copyright Act, such works are not entitled to domestic copyright protection under U.S. law and are therefore in the public domain. This website is developed as a part of the world’s largest public domain archive, PICRYL.com, and not developed or endorsed by the U.S. National Archives. https://www.picryl.com

ck “support @ getarchive dot net”.

Raymond Loewy; PD courtesy NARA.

 

I’m going to check to find out if this side-text might possibly somehow also go into the Image widget, as I don’t know, yes I do, I couldn’t find this before because I didn’t understand this NARA and Picryl public domain business, that these were there the last time I’d looked but I’d overlooked them as I nearly had now because those “Download” big buttons make me nervous that I’m somehow pre-agreeing to pay for anything with “l’argent.”
I don’t know what a U.S. photographer or NARA itself was doing out in Paris, maybe it’s connected to his work for NASA somehow but they seem just ordinary A Day In the Life of someone, of Mr. and Mrs. Loewy and some little kid they had, just ordinary-day photos of themselves, and this is the only one where he’s sort of looking right at the camera for a good view. There are all kinds oof the Terms and Conditions and so I’d guess one of them is likely to be that you can’t even crop the photos. I don’t know what that glass thing sitting on the corner of the table near what’s likely a lamp is. Why is there this big new gray bar down here though too. I’ve never seen that before.
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