“Judgment Call,” by Suzy Welch

Judgment Call, p.1, Suzy Welch/Wetlaufer’s 1992 novel that I think is allegoric for her people’s, like these examples, experiences. I think the detective on this first page allegorizes the relationship between the protagonist’s type and the fraud-parent’s trype. I couldn’t understand why later in the story she doesn’t tell him the boy had probably murdered her next-door neighbors and finally I realized that she’d noticed there’s some sort of collusion or symbiosis between the boy as murderer and the detective as scavenger and so she was as afraid of him as of the boy. Here are some reviews I’d found:   Suzanne Wetlaufer’s 1992 novel, “Judgment Call, 4 short reviews.”

Why is there an alternative text box, what does it do. I try not to use question marks.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Welch, the former Ms. Wetlaufer, author of the 1992 novel, “Judgment Call,” that I think is important allegory for explaining the situation of her ancestors and the Autists and other types of the global-system stereotypes. Mr. Welch is very important to everything also, like John Carroll, 1735-1815.

A different book she wrote.

This is a “combo” when I was learning to make pdfs, of bits from 3 different books, first 4 pages from a book on Dutch Schultz, from the Bronx, then 10 pages from Robin Moore’s 1969 “The French Connection” write-up, and then, in backwards order yet I think, 7 pages from near the end of Suzanne Wetlaufer/Welch’s “Judgment Call” novel.

9/14/17, I haven’t made any progress with anything so I’m going to type-out the little review pieces I have of Ms. Welch/Wetlaufer’s 1992 “Judgment Call, then maybe combine them (if there’s a) later:

Library Journal Review:

Tough young journalist Sherry Estabrook moves to Miami to escape her aristocratic, unloving parents and takes a job on The Citizen. On assignment at a high school for a story about teens and drugs she meets Manuel Velo who tells her that he has been a hit man for the Lopez mob since he was 14. With visions of a Pulitzer goading her on, Sherry furiously pursues the story, not realizing that Manuel is becoming obsessed with hr. The psychopath draws her ever more tightly into his web, until her poor judgment leads to tragedy. The author, herself a former journalist, crafts a gripping plot in this first novel, not as gruesome as Thomas Harris’s The Silence of the Lambs….

Booklist Review:

Intelligent and suspenseful, this thriller, the author’s first, has already been optioned for a movie and selected by the Literary and Mystery Guilds. A cinch for popular success, it’s chock-full of exaggerated characters, juicy subplots, digestible social commentary, passion, obsession, insanity, ambition, dread, and violence. It’s the kind of book that makes a reader feel both superior and eager, always two steps ahead of the main character but several behind the writer. Sherry Estabrook, a novice newspaper reporter and the daughter of a corrupt judge, came to steamy Miami by way of Marblehead, Massachusetts, a bastion of Yankee aristocracy and decadence. All nerves and spleen (but of course, drop-dead beautiful,) she’s determined to land the one big story that will catapult her to fame well before she turns 30. Poor judgment is the leitmotif of the book. Sherry’s evident in everything she does, from choosing boyfriends to harassing her nasty neighbors, but her worse offense is to trust a 16-year old assassin. Manuel offers her the story of her life, the story of his, including detailed descriptions of 17 murders he committed for the ruthless Lopez family. Sherry spends hours alone with Manuel and her tape recorder, in spite of his obvious infatuation with her and lethal madness. Naturally, things get dicey, dangerous, and complicated, pulling Sherry’s friends and coworkers into a vortex of stupidity, evil, and death. Clever, well-constructed, and not too bloody, this will please the good-read crowd. (4/15/92, Donna Seaman)

Publisher’s Weekly Review:

Ambition and personal need clash with the law and professional ethics in this engaging but uneven first novel about murder and the media in the killing fields of South Florida’s cocaine trade. Beautiful, brash and bring, Sherry Estabrook has fled the country-club lifestyle of her New England heritage for the heat of Miami, where she reports on crime for the Miami Citizen. While researching a piece on drug use in the schools, she and her partner, Belinda, meet Manuel, a 16-year old assassin for the Lopez crime family. Spurred by visions of a Pulitzer Prize, the young women set out to chronicle Manuel’s handiwork — some 18 grisly murders so far. Soon Sherry is entangled in a complex, dangerous relationship with the troubled boy. For star reporters, Sherry and Belinda are incredibly naive, blind to perils that scream out at the reader and to important details of the story they’re pursuing. Despite a tendency to over-explain characters’ personalities and motivations, Wetlaufer’s evocation of steamy Miami, her unusual villain and clever plotting create a gripping, often horrifying thriller. Literary Guild and Mystery Guild alternates, film rights to Disney. (July, copyright PW.)

Kirkus Review:

A reporter’s juicy nightmare: Miami Citizen scribe Sherry Estabrook, investigating drugs in a local high school, meets 16-year old Manuel Velo, who tells her he’s iced 18 people (he thinks it’s 18,) for Mimi Lopez’s mob. Of course it doesn’t sound like a nightmare to Sherry and her sidekick Belinda McEvoy, who are dreaming of Pulitzers before Sherry can even set up the first taped interview with Manuel. But as Sherry, — still trying (courtesy of endless flashbacks) to use this story to get even with her unloving Boston father, Judge Estabrook, — is running Manuel’s sordid, matter-of-fact revelations through a lie-detector-test, driving him around to revisit the scenes of his hits, and swallowing his tale of wanting to start a new life away from the mob, she’s overlooking screamingly telltale signs: Manuel’s lack of remorse for his crimes, his obsessive attraction to her, and incidentally her sometime lover Brazil’s newfound devotion to his hardscrabble wife Jean, and Belinda’s unlikely romance with Officer Eladio Alvarez. All guarantee that Sherry’s life is about to go into a horrifying, lonely tailspin. After chapters and chapters of painful teasing — it’s in this queasy-making middle section that first-novelist Wetlaufer really shines, — Manuel tries to consolidate what he thinks is his romance with Sherry by executing two pesky neighbors who’d killed her cat, and the book promptly goes over the top with a whirlwind of threats, betrayals, counterplots, sleepless nights — and one final midnight meeting between Sherry and Manuel, whose heart-rending denouement is reassuringly predictable. Like Manuel, Wetlaufer goes for the jugular; there’s more subtlety in a tabloid headline.

— Checking it now I see I haven’t yet written to Little, Brown publishing company. I haven’t used much but the 1 picture and everything has been emergency basis, no frivolous uses of the material, but now this is 10 pages that I’d gotten for personal information emergency-use and I didn’t know how to do this photocopying well back then to separate the pieces. Suzy Wetlaufer/Welch’s 7 or 8 pages are at the bottom under “The French Connection’s” pages and it’s almost all of the end except it’s backwards with page 424 being the bottom of the pdf, then above it is 425, 426, 427, 428 and 429. I think the book was 430. My point was trying to find and show the part where she tries to explain to the father-character what her/the situation is/was, me trying to show her confusion and breathlessness, if that’s in there, from my recollection of my quick 18 hours with the whole book back in Nov.-Dec. 2014 when I’d found it but I didn’t get to spend much time with it before it was gone from library shelves. Then this copy I’d gotten from the Library of Congress but I only get a short time to try to intake a lot of material and have to work quickly so I haven’t really gone back over this yet. My point is that the global-system runs, as with this “God” of the Ghent Altarpiece group’s picture just below here (I’ll try to get a color copy soon,) that the system runs where a captive very similar to the novel protagonist, Sherry, based on Ms. Welch and her situation working for a Florida newspaper back in the ’80s I think it was, some similar situation and she turned it into a novel but I think it’s a gifted piece of work that actually allegorizes the larger picture, that the Autist underworld gave these captives the title of “God” and judge and magician-servant and the global-system runs on their “creation” of all these things, like the computers and the cell phones and supermarkets and whatever we have…. And I’m trying to get attention to that that tantamount I think the word is, that’s like letting someone like this protagonist Sherry or Ms. Welch herself or this guy dressed-up as “God” run the planet as captives to the Autists and run this “Armageddon Program” that’s been being perpetrated onto me for decades now and I keep trying to get attention to that “Sherry” et al., maybe a band of 12 uber-Masters of the Universe magicians or what not, are like Sherry in those 424-29 pages, breathlessly trying to describe how all this disaster is just a whirlwind she was caught-up into, but isn’t the world beautiful, come look with me, to a guy who probably isn’t her real parent. Everything is fake and she’s trying to explain to a faker and she can’t tell the real truth because actually she’s a captive person to the paternal character so she has to “act” as though she believes the story while trying to get him to normalize, but here I’m reading too much into it because I don’t know how to describe that her parents can’t really be allegorical when nobody but me says the novel is allegorical. I did try to get a note to this publisher, but I think it was a computer-form they had me fill out maybe, and I simply don’t ever hear back from anyone about anything, just am always in a vacuum doing things like this, like I’m talking to myself to while away the time while Sherry’s type has thought up this “Program” LURE-way of getting the father-character’s wishes fulfilled. The 16-year old boy Manuel is the Autist-psychopath in this story. There was one other part I’d wanted to photocopy but I don’t want to get anyone upset about copyright infringement so I’d skipped it but after I reread this clip maybe I’ll recollect the situation a little better, while I was only able to skim the most of this really good book, full of all kinds of details that pertain to the larger picture. One of the major characters is named Brazil and I couldn’t figure out why that character had such a big role but now I’m starting to realize that Alexander Graham Bell might have undercover-spent alot of years there while this guy pictured in the file below from the 13th and K Sts. signboard was holding his place here perhaps.

And then Mr. Welch had worked at General Electric’s Plastics division in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and I’m trying to trace where there this mural is/was, that has a generational-slave #2 holding that picket sign: Pittsfield. Mr. Welch is said to be from Salem in Massachusetts.

(a duplicate storage:)

Judgment Call, p.1, Suzy Welch/Wetlaufer’s 1992 novel that I think is allegoric for her people’s, like these examples, experiences. I think the detective on this first page allegorizes the relationship between the protagonist’s type and the fraud-parent’s trype. I couldn’t understand why later in the story she doesn’t tell him the boy had probably murdered her next-door neighbors and finally I realized that she’d noticed there’s some sort of collusion or symbiosis between the boy as murderer and the detective as scavenger and so she was as afraid of him as of the boy. Here are some reviews I’d found:   Suzanne Wetlaufer’s 1992 novel, “Judgment Call, 4 short reviews.”

Why is there an alternative text box, what does it do. I try not to use question marks.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Welch, the former Ms. Wetlaufer, author of the 1992 novel, “Judgment Call,” that I think is important allegory for explaining the situation of her ancestors and the Autists and other types of the global-system stereotypes. Mr. Welch is very important to everything also, like John Carroll, 1735-1815.

A different book she wrote.

This is a “combo” when I was learning to make pdfs, of bits from 3 different books, first 4 pages from a book on Dutch Schultz, from the Bronx, then 10 pages from Robin Moore’s 1969 “The French Connection” write-up, and then, in backwards order yet I think, 7 pages from near the end of Suzanne Wetlaufer/Welch’s “Judgment Call” novel.

Library Journal Review: Tough young journalist Sherry Estabrook moves to Miami to escape her aristocratic, unloving parents and takes a job on The Citizen. On assignment at a high school for a story about teens and drugs she meets Manuel Velo who tells her that he has been a hit man for the Lopez mob since he was 14. With visions of a Pulitzer goading her on, Sherry furiously pursues the story, not realizing that Manuel is becoming obsessed with hr. The psychopath draws her ever more tightly into his web, until her poor judgment leads to tragedy. The author, herself a former journalist, crafts a gripping plot in this first novel, not as gruesome as Thomas Harris’s The Silence of the Lambs….

Booklist Review: Intelligent and suspenseful, this thriller, the author’s first, has already been optioned for a movie and selected by the Literary and Mystery Guilds. A cinch for popular success, it’s chock-full of exaggerated characters, juicy subplots, digestible social commentary, passion, obsession, insanity, ambition, dread, and violence. It’s the kind of book that makes a reader feel both superior and eager, always two steps ahead of the main character but several behind the writer. Sherry Estabrook, a novice newspaper reporter and the daughter of a corrupt judge, came to steamy Miami by way of Marblehead, Massachusetts, a bastion of Yankee aristocracy and decadence. All nerves and spleen (but of course, drop-dead beautiful,) she’s determined to land the one big story that will catapult her to fame well before she turns 30. Poor judgment is the leitmotif of the book. Sherry’s evident in everything she does, from choosing boyfriends to harassing her nasty neighbors, but her worse offense is to trust a 16-year old assassin. Manuel offers her the story of her life, the story of his, including detailed descriptions of 17 murders he committed for the ruthless Lopez family. Sherry spends hours alone with Manuel and her tape recorder, in spite of his obvious infatuation with her and lethal madness. Naturally, things get dicey, dangerous, and complicated, pulling Sherry’s friends and coworkers into a vortex of stupidity, evil, and death. Clever, well-constructed, and not too bloody, this will please the good-read crowd. (4/15/92, Donna Seaman)

Publisher’s Weekly Review: Ambition and personal need clash with the law and professional ethics in this engaging but uneven first novel about murder and the media in the killing fields of South Florida’s cocaine trade. Beautiful, brash and bring, Sherry Estabrook has fled the country-club lifestyle of her New England heritage for the heat of Miami, where she reports on crime for the Miami Citizen. While researching a piece on drug use in the schools, she and her partner, Belinda, meet Manuel, a 16-year old assassin for the Lopez crime family. Spurred by visions of a Pulitzer Prize, the young women set out to chronicle Manuel’s handiwork — some 18 grisly murders so far. Soon Sherry is entangled in a complex, dangerous relationship with the troubled boy. For star reporters, Sherry and Belinda are incredibly naive, blind to perils that scream out at the reader and to important details of the story they’re pursuing. Despite a tendency to over-explain characters’ personalities and motivations, Wetlaufer’s evocation of steamy Miami, her unusual villain and clever plotting create a gripping, often horrifying thriller. Literary Guild and Mystery Guild alternates, film rights to Disney. (July, copyright PW.)

Kirkus Review: A reporter’s juicy nightmare: Miami Citizen scribe Sherry Estabrook, investigating drugs in a local high school, meets 16-year old Manuel Velo, who tells her he’s iced 18 people (he thinks it’s 18,) for Mimi Lopez’s mob. Of course it doesn’t sound like a nightmare to Sherry and her sidekick Belinda McEvoy, who are dreaming of Pulitzers before Sherry can even set up the first taped interview with Manuel. But as Sherry, — still trying (courtesy of endless flashbacks) to use this story to get even with her unloving Boston father, Judge Estabrook, — is running Manuel’s sordid, matter-of-fact revelations through a lie-detector-test, driving him around to revisit the scenes of his hits, and swallowing his tale of wanting to start a new life away from the mob, she’s overlooking screamingly telltale signs: Manuel’s lack of remorse for his crimes, his obsessive attraction to her, and incidentally her sometime lover Brazil’s newfound devotion to his hardscrabble wife Jean, and Belinda’s unlikely romance with Officer Eladio Alvarez. All guarantee that Sherry’s life is about to go into a horrifying, lonely tailspin. After chapters and chapters of painful teasing — it’s in this queasy-making middle section that first-novelist Wetlaufer really shines, — Manuel tries to consolidate what he thinks is his romance with Sherry by executing two pesky neighbors who’d killed her cat, and the book promptly goes over the top with a whirlwind of threats, betrayals, counterplots, sleepless nights — and one final midnight meeting between Sherry and Manuel, whose heart-rending denouement is reassuringly predictable. Like Manuel, Wetlaufer goes for the jugular; there’s more subtlety in a tabloid headline.

— Checking it now I see I haven’t yet written to Little, Brown publishing company. I haven’t used much but the 1 picture and everything has been emergency basis, no frivolous uses of the material, but now this is 10 pages that I’d gotten for personal information emergency-use and I didn’t know how to do this photocopying well back then to separate the pieces. Suzy Wetlaufer/Welch’s 7 or 8 pages are at the bottom under “The French Connection’s” pages and it’s almost all of the end except it’s backwards with page 424 being the bottom of the pdf, then above it is 425, 426, 427, 428 and 429. I think the book was 430. My point was trying to find and show the part where she tries to explain to the father-character what her/the situation is/was, me trying to show her confusion and breathlessness, if that’s in there, from my recollection of my quick 18 hours with the whole book back in Nov.-Dec. 2014 when I’d found it but I didn’t get to spend much time with it before it was gone from library shelves. Then this copy I’d gotten from the Library of Congress but I only get a short time to try to intake a lot of material and have to work quickly so I haven’t really gone back over this yet. My point is that the global-system runs, as with this “God” of the Ghent Altarpiece group’s picture just below here (I’ll try to get a color copy soon,) that the system runs where a captive very similar to the novel protagonist, Sherry, based on Ms. Welch and her situation working for a Florida newspaper back in the ’80s I think it was, some similar situation and she turned it into a novel but I think it’s a gifted piece of work that actually allegorizes the larger picture, that the Autist underworld gave these captives the title of “God” and judge and magician-servant and the global-system runs on their “creation” of all these things, like the computers and the cell phones and supermarkets and whatever we have…. And I’m trying to get attention to that that tantamount I think the word is, that’s like letting someone like this protagonist Sherry or Ms. Welch herself or this guy dressed-up as “God” run the planet as captives to the Autists and run this “Armageddon Program” that’s been being perpetrated onto me for decades now and I keep trying to get attention to that “Sherry” et al., maybe a band of 12 uber-Masters of the Universe magicians or what not, are like Sherry in those 424-29 pages, breathlessly trying to describe how all this disaster is just a whirlwind she was caught-up into, but isn’t the world beautiful, come look with me, to a guy who probably isn’t her real parent. Everything is fake and she’s trying to explain to a faker and she can’t tell the real truth because actually she’s a captive person to the paternal character so she has to “act” as though she believes the story while trying to get him to normalize, but here I’m reading too much into it because I don’t know how to describe that her parents can’t really be allegorical when nobody but me says the novel is allegorical. I did try to get a note to this publisher, but I think it was a computer-form they had me fill out maybe, and I simply don’t ever hear back from anyone about anything, just am always in a vacuum doing things like this, like I’m talking to myself to while away the time while Sherry’s type has thought up this “Program” LURE-way of getting the father-character’s wishes fulfilled. The 16-year old boy Manuel is the Autist-psychopath in this story. There was one other part I’d wanted to photocopy but I don’t want to get anyone upset about copyright infringement so I’d skipped it but after I reread this clip maybe I’ll recollect the situation a little better, while I was only able to skim the most of this really good book, full of all kinds of details that pertain to the larger picture. One of the major characters is named Brazil and I couldn’t figure out why that character had such a big role but now I’m starting to realize that Alexander Graham Bell might have undercover-spent alot of years there while this guy pictured in the file below from the 13th and K Sts. signboard was holding his place here perhaps.

And then Mr. Welch had worked at General Electric’s Plastics division in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and I’m trying to trace where there this mural is/was, that has a generational-slave #2 holding that picket sign: Pittsfield. Mr. Welch is said to be from Salem in Massachusetts.

Detail from Bell’s notebook on getting the first transmission through to Watson.

 from the Testosterone book, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Welch, her being the author of the 1992 novel, “Judgment Call,” under her then-name of Suzanne Wetlaufer. I’m always trying to get anyone to look into this, according to me, all allegorical book about the system’s “generational-slave #2” -type, that I picture as coming from the guy portrayed in the Rembrandt-like “Man In Oriental Costume” here in the National Gallery of Art since about 1934, (gallery 48,) like pictured at the top of this file:

Only here I’m saying that

James A. Bailey of the Barnum & Bailey circus team was also from this type’s type as being important to all this Armageddon Plan’s being worked off off of me, that Mr. Bailey must have spent quite a bit of time in the Bronx, had passed from his home just north of there, commuting to the Madison Square Garden and probably had alot of dealings with the Bronx Zoo, (passed 1906.) He’d also lived at 150th Street and St. Nicholas Place, upper Harlem just across from the Bronx more or less. My new thought about this “type” or race or breed or line or what lingo doesn’t offend anyone in the world, is that I’d found fiction-type evidence that they too have the Autists’ brain damage enough that it’s notable, as we’ve all inherited it to various degree. In the “Judgment Call” book that I think is allegorical for the whole type of people’s system-experience, the saddest part is that the ethereal blonde type character gets fatally shot in the gruesome denouement scene and she passes, an angel-type female, sad that allegorically she had to go, which would represent the loss of the entire type for our species and that’s why I keep saying that we’re going to TOTAL PLANET EXTINCTION as the Autists had cliff-pushed all the best types of people millennia ago, periodically rampaging Europe and where else, but especially those French cliffs. I’d had nothing to do in all this turmoil today but try to think for clues as to all this Armageddon and somehow had thought of that book and that the “best” character had had to be sacrificed, the spirit-able type of people, the type who could lift up to fill the universe, keep God company and delight. Years ago I’d heard some cynical jokes that heaven sure must be boring as all they do is sit around and play harps, but the reality is that the spirit world was in a continuous-emergency state by the Autists’ psychopathy, back with cracking those dinosaur eggs to the extinction of the dinosaurs, spirits had to stick close to the earth and try to prevent these terrors, and it’s been the losing battle. Then I’d recalled the odd scene about that when that character had gotten married the protagonist had gone through the big trauma that it was her fault that the psychopathic boy had murdered her neighbors, (that she wouldn’t tell “the” police about, represented by that “Teddie” character that I suspect is connected then to this Vajiravudh-“fraud-parent” difficulty all over my life, ) that she’d gone and slept on the couch of the newlyweds small apartment, not for just a few days but for 2 or 3 weeks I think the novel had said, but I only had about 3 6-hour chances to read the whole thing in and then the book was gone, (because I couldn’t get to that branch library where it was because winter of winter,) and that isn’t alot to make quick judgments on, but now that was almost 4 years ago and I’m still mulling on what I can recall for clues toward all this horror, and I realize that sleeping on the newlyweds couch and the girl’s just happening to die are signs of the protagonist’s brain damage like I’m talking about, and also sleeping on their couch for so long is a sign of Autism-selfishness, lack of consideration. It was all very casually put, that the girl was very casual about the friend’s staying there, but after reflection I realize that that’s all wrong behavior, it shows that the protagonist, in her relations with her friend altogether, all their interactions through the story, there is that brain damage there, like our society today where “everything is broken” but no one can see or pinpoint that anything’s specifically wrong, I’m reflecting back and to my recollection of the quick-scanning of the complex-type story, that sleeping on their couch was ill. The story explains it all from the protagonist’s, Sherry’s, point of view of all the trauma she’d gone through, and that’s what had had me spending about 2 months trying to figure why she hadn’t simply told the cop about the boy’s having been a visitor and had probably done the murder, then I realized that the cop hadn’t told her, as her being a reporter, that over a dozen murders had recently occurred where the modus operandi was to shoot the victim through the left side of the throat, a jugular vein I guess. From pondering that book is how I’d gotten “evidence” that people are turned to petroleum, by the protagonist’s mentioning how one of the victims had been left dead in a trailer and had started turning into a pile of goo, black goo.